The Stourbridge Line Rail Excursion

The smoky dim mists, similar to outflows from turn-of-the-century steam trains, skimmed over the generally moving, green Northern Pocono Mountains on a current Memorial Day end of the week. Might they be able to have been clues of the region’s railroad past?

The weed-growing track, supporting a diesel motor, a stainless steel New York Central, and three maroon, Pennsylvania Railroad mentors beside the Wayne County Visitors Center, were balanced for their 13:00, 25-mile hurried to Hawley and Lackawaxen as the “Lackawaxen Limited,” worked by the Stourbridge Line’s Delaware, Lackawaxen, and Stourbridge Railroad Company. From rail’s past, obviously developed rail’s available.

Having been worked by the Wayne County Chamber of Commerce, and introducing traveler prepare benefit as far back as September of 1979, the Stourbridge Line kept running for over three decades as a prior version, stopping tasks on December 11, 2011, preceding the present Delaware, Lackawaxen, and Stourbridge Railroad Company, keep running by the Myles Group, re-handled the tracks as of May 9, 2015.

A 50-minute drive from Scranton to Honesdale, an examine of Main Street, a jab in the Wayne County Historical Society Museum, and an accumulation of handouts, leaflets, bulletins, manuals, and territory related writing kept me here, on the wooden stage, encompassed by an expanding assemble of the prepare’s travelers.

The prepare’s railroad history, albeit noiselessly inconspicuous, appeared to address me. A look over the mentors uncovered the town’s Victorian engineering, which, as a saved pocket, appeared to have withstood the tick of time, and by the block, ticket window donning Visitors Center was a track-connected reproduction of a wooden coal wagon showed on a grade. Rails unmistakably associated the town with its past.

A plaque outside of the authentic culture broadcasted, “Delaware and Hudson Canal. End of the conduit joining the Hudson and Delaware waterways. Assembled 1825 to 1828. A gravity railroad feeder achieved Carbondale. For a long time the anthracite exchange outlet for the locale.”

As I heard the “All Aboard” moan of the conductor-a virtual tone-and pitch-idealize resound of the direction given via trainmen for very nearly two centuries-and crawled toward the mentor with my kindred travelers, I understood that something about the region had attracted me to its past.

Where, for instance, was the Delaware and Hudson Canal and what connection, assuming any, did it have to this “Gravity Railroad,” with which Honesdale appeared to be synonymous?

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